Category Archives: Web Design

How to Customizing the Office Applications

In this chapter, you learn about customizing the Office 2016 applications, including working with the application options and customizing the interface. Topics include the following:

  • Accessing the Options dialog box for the Office 2016 applications
  • Changing your Office 2016 user name and initials
  • Pinning, hiding, and customizing the Ribbon
  • Positioning and customizing the Quick Access Toolbar
  • Changing the background for the Office 2016 applications

This book is called My Office 2016, so it’s time you learned how to put the “My” in Office 2016. I speak, of course, about customizing the applications in some way. After all, the interface and settings that you see when you first use Office 2016 are the “factory defaults.” That is, how the program looks and how it works out of the box has been specified by Microsoft. However, this “official” version of the program is almost always designed with some mythical “average” user in mind. Nothing is wrong with this concept, but it almost certainly means that the program is not set up optimally for you. This chapter shows you how to get the most out of the main Office 2016 programs—Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, OneNote, and Access—by performing a few customization chores to set up the program to suit the way you work.

 

Working with Application Options

Customizing Office 2016 most often means tweaking a setting or two in the Options dialog box that comes with each program. Each program has a unique Options dialog box configuration, so it’s beyond the scope of this book to discuss these dialog boxes in detail. Instead, I introduce them by showing you how to get them onscreen and by going through some useful settings.

 

Working with the Options Dialog Box

You often need to access the Options dialog box for an Office 2016 application, so let’s begin by quickly reviewing the steps required to access and work with this dialog box in your current Office 2016 program.

  1. Select File. The Office 2016 application, Excel in this example, displays the File menu.
  2. Select Options. The Office 2016 application opens the Options dialog box.
  3. Select a tab. The Office 2016 application displays the options related to the selected tab.
  4. Use the controls to tweak the application’s settings.
  5. Select OK. The Office 2016 application puts the changed options into effect.

Working with Seasonal Time Series

Matters get incrementally more complicated when you have a time series that’s characterized in part by seasonality: the tendency of its level to rise and fall in accordance with the passing of the seasons. We use the term season in a more general sense than its everyday meaning of the year’s four seasons. In the context of predictive analytics, a season can be a day if patterns repeat weekly, or a year in terms of presidential election cycles, or just about anything in between. An eight-hour shift in a hospital can represent a season.

This chapter takes a look at how to decompose a time series so that you can see how its seasonality operates apart from its trend (if any). As you might expect from the material in Chapters 3 and 4, several approaches are available to you.

 

Simple Seasonal Averages

The use of simple seasonal averages to model a time series can sometimes provide you with a fairly crude model for the data. But the approach pays attention to the seasons in the data set, and it can easily be much more accurate as a forecasting technique than simple exponential smoothing when the seasonality is pronounced. Certainly it serves as a useful introduction to some of the procedures used with time series that are both seasonal and trended, so have a look at the example in Figure 5.1.

The data and chart shown in Figure 5.1 represent the average number of daily hits to a website that caters to fans of the National Football League. Each observation in column D represents the average number of hits per day in each of four quarters across a five-year time span.

 

Identifying a Seasonal Pattern

You can tell from the averages in the range G2:G5 that a distinct quarterly effect is taking place. The largest average number of hits occurs during fall and winter, when the main 16 games and the playoffs are scheduled. Interest, as measured by average daily hits, declines during the spring and summer months.

Fields and Forms in Word

Fields are the often-underappreciated placeholders that work behind the scenes in a document. They help perform the magic involved with many of the most powerful features in Word, such as mail merging, indexing, automatic generation of tables of contents, automatic figure numbering, cross-referencing, page numbering, and more.

There are many different types of fields, each with a specific purpose, but they break down into three main categories. You can use fields to do the following:

  • Insert text or graphics into the document, such as page numbering, dates and times, text from other documents, graphics from external files, document properties, or calculated values.
  • Mark a location for later use, such as with a bookmark, table of contents marker, or indexing code.
  • Perform an action, such as running a macro or opening a hyperlink in a web browser.

Yet another way to use fields is to create user-interactive forms. In this chapter, you see how fields work and how to insert them, and you find out how to use form fields to create forms.

 

How Word Uses Fields

Many people use fields in Word without even realizing it because so many of Word’s features automatically insert and modify fields. For example, when you insert a date or time and set it to be automatically updated, Word inserts a {Date} or {Time} code. And when you create an OLE link to an object, Word inserts a {Link} code.

Throughout this book, you’ve learned about fields in an indirect way. Whenever a feature has been discussed that used a field, you’ve learned to insert that field via a button or dialog box, but you haven’t looked too deeply yet at what’s really going on behind the curtain. Table 16.1 lists some of the Word features that employ fields and cross-references them to where those skills are covered in the book.

This chapter delves into the technical nitty-gritty details that govern fields and shows you how you can select, insert, modify, and format fields to accomplish a variety of document-creation and formatting tasks. Even if you don’t end up working manually with fields very often, this is not wasted study! The more you understand about how fields really work, the better you will be able to troubleshoot problems that may occur, or to tweak an individual field’s options to fit an unusual formatting need.

Know The Basic Formulas in Excel

A worksheet is merely a lifeless collection of numbers and text until you define some kind of relationship among the various entries. You do this by creating formulas that perform calculations and produce results. This chapter takes you through some formula basics, including constructing simple arithmetic and text formulas, understanding the all-important topic of operator precedence, copying and moving worksheet formulas, and making formulas easier to build and read by taking advantage of range names.

 

Understanding Formula Basics

Most worksheets are created to provide answers to specific questions: What is the company’s profit? Are expenses over or under budget, and by how much? What is the future value of an investment? How big will an employee’s bonus be this year? You can answer these questions, and an infinite number of others, by using Excel formulas.

All Excel formulas have the same general structure: an equal sign (=) followed by one or more operands, which can be values, cell references, ranges, range names, or function names, separated by one or more operators, which are symbols that combine the operands in some way, such as the plus sign (+) and the greater-than sign (>).

 

Formula Limits in Excel 2016

It’s a good idea to know the limits Excel sets on various aspects of formulas and worksheet models, even though it’s unlikely that you’ll ever bump up against these limits. Formula limits that were expanded in Excel 2007 remain the same in Excel 2016. So, in the unlikely event that you’re coming to Excel 2016 from Excel 2003 or earlier, Table 3.1 shows you the updated limits.

 

Entering and Editing Formulas

Entering a new formula into a worksheet appears to be a straightforward process:

  1. Select the cell in which you want to enter the formula.
  2. Type an equal sign (=) to tell Excel that you’re entering a formula.
  3. Type the formula’s operands and operators.
  4. Press Enter to confirm the formula.

However, Excel has three different input modes that determine how it interprets certain keystrokes and mouse actions:

  • When you type the equal sign to begin the formula, Excel goes into Enter mode, which is the mode you use to enter text (such as the formula’s operands and operators).
  • If you press any keyboard navigation key (such as Page Up, Page Down, or any arrow key), or if you click any other cell in the worksheet, Excel enters Point mode. This is the mode you use to select a cell or range as a formula operand. When you’re in Point mode, you can use any of the standard range-selection techniques. Note that Excel returns to Enter mode as soon as you type an operator or any character.
  • If you press F2, Excel enters Edit mode, which is the mode you use to make changes to the formula. For example, when you’re in Edit mode, you can use the left and right arrow keys to move the cursor to another part of the formula for deleting or inserting characters. You can also enter Edit mode by clicking anywhere within the formula. Press F2 to return to Enter mode.

Sorting Data in Microsoft Excel

In this chapter, you’ll learn the various ways of sorting data, allowing you to view data from least to greatest, greatest to least, and even by color. You’ll also learn how to do the following:

  • Sorting data with one click
  • Sorting using a custom, non-alphabetical order
  • Sorting by color or icon
  • Rearranging columns with a few clicks of the mouse and keyboard

You’ll often need to sort your data, whether it be numerically, alphabetically, by color, or by icon. You aren’t limited to sorting the rows—columns can also be sorted.

Sorting data allows you to change how you view it. For example, if your dataset has a date column, you can view the oldest data at the top, or you can view the newest data at the top. You can also sort the data so like values, such as product names, are grouped together. You can even combine sorts so that you not only view the products grouped together, but in date order from oldest to newest.

 

Using the Sort Dialog Box

The Sort dialog box provides the most versatile way of sorting your data because it allows you to specify how you want the data sorted. When you use the dialog box, Excel applies each sort in the order it appears in the list.

 

Sort by Values

The Sort dialog box makes it easy to sort by multiple columns. A different sort method can be applied for each level. The sorts are done in the order they appear in the list.

  1. Select a cell in the dataset. Excel will use this cell to determine the location and size of the dataset.
  2. On the Data tab, select Sort.
  3. If the data has a header row, but Excel doesn’t recognize it, select the My Data Has Headers check box.
  4. From the Sort By drop-down, select the first column header by which to sort.
  5. From the Sort On drop-down, select Values.
  6. From the Order drop-down, select the order by which the column’s data should be sorted. Choose A to Z to sort in alphabetical order; choose Z to A to sort in the opposite order. If the data is numerical, the drop-down options will change to Smallest to Largest and Largest to Smallest.

Microsoft Office Application That Useful to Help Your Work

Adding text in an Office application is easy; just start typing. If the default text formatting doesn’t suit your needs, however, Office also offers numerous text formatting and customization options.

The Home tab in Word, PowerPoint, Publisher, and Excel is home to a solid collection of text-formatting tools, giving you the option to select a font style and size; change text color; or apply bold, italic, and underlining to your text. You can also align text, use WordArt to create sophisticated text objects, search for and replace text, and use the Font dialog box for more advanced formatting.

Finally, you can fix any spelling errors by performing a spell check—something you need to do on every Office document.

 

Formatting Text on the Home Tab (Word)

You’ll often need to sort your data, whether it be numerically, alphabetically, by color, or by icon. You aren’t limited to sorting the rows—columns can also be sorted.

Sorting data allows you to change how you view it. For example, if your dataset has a date column, you can view the oldest data at the top, or you can view the newest data at the top. You can also sort the data so like values, such as product names, are grouped together. You can even combine sorts so that you not only view the products grouped together, but in date order from oldest to newest.

Sharing Office Files

The Microsoft Office 2016 applications provide you with all the tools you need to create documents, presentations, workbooks, and publications. After you create your various files using the Office applications, it is up to you to manage your files and share them with colleagues and co-workers.

In this chapter, we take a look at the Office file formats used in each of the Office applications. We also look at your options for managing and sharing files.

Understanding Office File Formats

The default file formats for each of the Office applications (all except for OneNote) take advantage of the open XML (eXtensible Markup Language) file standards. The file formats provide benefits in terms of file compaction, improved damage recovery, better detection of files containing macros, and better compatibility with other vendor software.

Although some backward-compatibility issues may be involved when you attempt to share a file using one of these file formats with a user who still works with an earlier version of a particular Office application (think pre-Office 2007 versions), most problems have been ironed out. Users still working with earlier versions of the Office applications can take advantage of various conversion utilities and software updates that enable them to convert or directly open a file using one of the new file formats.

You can also save your files in file formats that offer backward compatibility for co-workers still using older versions of the Office applications. And the Office applications (such as Word and Excel) provide you with compatibility-checking tools that help negate any issues with files shared with users of legacy Office applications.

As already mentioned, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint use the open XML file formats by default when you save a file in these applications. And you have a number of other file format options in these applications, if needed.

Publisher 2016, on the other hand, saves publications by default in the .pub file type. The .pub file type is “directly” compatible with Publisher 2013, through Publisher 2003. Although Publisher does not enable you to save a publication in the open XML file format (like Word and Excel), you can save Publisher files in the XPS file type, which is an XML file format for “electronic paper.” Publisher also has file types available that you can use to make your publications backward compatible with collaborators who are using previous versions of Microsoft Publisher.

The Office 2016 applications also provide other file formats that make it simple for you to share your documents or workbooks in a format designed for easy viewing. For example, you can use the PDF file format (created by Adobe Systems), which enables users who have the free Adobe Reader software installed on their computer to view your file. Windows 10 also provides a PDF viewer (Windows Reader) to view a PDF document and change from a one-page view to a two-page view. The viewer also enables you to search the PDF document using the Find tool.

The XML electronic paper file format (XPS) also makes it easy for others to view your work. Windows 10 supplies an XPS viewer that enables any Windows 10 user to open and view files in the XPS file type. Figure 3.1 shows the Windows 10 XPS viewer containing a Word document converted to an XPS document.

Referring to Ranges

A range can be a cell, a row, a column, or a grouping of any of these. The RANGE object is probably the most frequently used object in Excel VBA; after all, you are manipulating data on a sheet. Although a range can refer to any grouping of cells on a sheet, it can refer to only one sheet at a time. If you want to refer to ranges on multiple sheets, you must refer to each sheet separately.

This chapter shows you different ways of referring to ranges, such as specifying a row or column. You’ll also find out how to manipulate cells based on the active cell and how to create a new range from overlapping ranges.

The Range object is a property of the Worksheet object. This means it requires that a sheet be active or else it must reference a worksheet. Both of the following lines mean the same thing if Worksheets(1) is the active sheet:

There are several ways to refer to a Range object. Range("A1") is the most identifiable because that is how the macro recorder refers to it. However, all the following are equivalent when referring to a range:

Range("D5")
[D5]
Range("B3").Range("C3")
Cells(5,4)
Range("A1").Offset(4,3)
Range("MyRange") 'assuming that D5 has a 'Name of MyRange

Some Knowladge about Graphics in Publisher

In this chapter, you learn techniques for working with pictures and other graphics. Topics include the following:

  • Inserting Pictures
  • Moving and Resizing Pictures
  • Working with the Picture Tools
  • Creating and Formatting WordArt
  • Inserting Borders & Accents

In Chapter 2, “Working with Page Elements,” you learned how to make adjustments to the page elements such as margins, orientation, paper size, color schemes, and backgrounds. In this chapter, you learn how to add and work with visual elements such as photos, WordArt, borders, and accents. Then, Chapter 4, “Adding Text Boxes,” shows you how to create and work with text boxes, so you can sneak in some information with your visuals.

Without question, adding photographs to your publication is the most popular way to incorporate colorful visuals. Realistic, razor-sharp-focused images immediately elevate a publication’s status and the credibility of the information within it. Publisher 2016 has a powerful collection of picture tools.

 

Inserting Pictures

Pictures are a powerful way to communicate. They guide readers through a publication by catching their eye, creating interest, illustrating key ideas, and controlling the flow. Key concepts can be reinforced and clarified by using informative picture captions and relevant images.

Think about the last marketing piece you got in the mail. What initially drew enough of your interest to glance at it, rather than just tossing it into the recycle bin? Unless it’s an “everything is free” flyer, it was probably the illustrations. Bright, colorful, briefly informative—they communicate as much as the text. Even more so to a reader in a hurry.

 

Inserting Pictures Stored Locally

When the image you want to use is stored either on your computer, or a computer on your network, you simply browse for the file to bring it in to the publication. In the next section, you learn how to locate an image online.

  1. Click the Insert tab on the Ribbon. The Pictures command button is in the Illustrations group, along with the Online Pictures, Shapes, and Picture Placeholder command buttons.
  2. Click the Pictures command button. The Insert Picture dialog box opens.

Did you get a new Apple Watch for the holidays

Activity, shown in Figure 2.22, is designed for use on an ongoing basis, throughout your day. The app takes advantage of the watch’s built-in sensors and continuously monitors your level of movement, exercise, and periods of inactivity (as long as you’re wearing the watch).

As you’ll discover, this information displays in several ways, and syncs automatically with the Activity and Health apps running on your iPhone. The Activity app also shares data with other health and fitness apps, as needed.

 

Use the Workout App

You use the Workout app, shown in Figure 2.24, for whenever you engage in any type of cardio fitness workout session, such as jogging, running, bike riding, or using an elliptical machine (or treadmill). The Workout app collects and displays real-time stats, such as time, distance, calories, pace, and speed.

Like in the Activity app, the data the watch collects and displays automatically syncs with the iPhone, and a growing selection of other health- and fitness-oriented apps, including the Health app that comes preinstalled with iOS 8.2 on the iPhone, can use this data.

The Health app on the iPhone collects real-time health and fitness-related data from the iPhone, Apple Watch, and other compatible equipment (such as a Bluetooth scale, for example), as well as data you manually input, and then monitors, analyzes, stores, and potentially shares that information from the one, centralized Health app.

Just as Notification Center monitors apps and keeps track of all alerts, alarms, and notifications, and then displays this information in one centralized place, the Health app serves a similar purpose, but deals exclusively with health, fitness, nutrition/diet, and sleep-related data and information.